1
:: Overview | Programme Objectives | Learning Outcomes | Classifications |Programme Structures and Features ::
| Career Prospects dan Other Information | Subject Synopsis | Home ::


SYNOPSIS

SLAE 1012 - FUNDAMENTALS OF GRAMMAR

The course aims to introduce to students the elements of grammar of the English language. It also aims to consolidate students’ knowledge and understanding of the various grammatical features of the English Language through review and analysis of sentences and short texts from various sources. Practice in accurate use of grammatical items to enhance students grammatical accuracy and proficiency also forms an essential component of this course.

References
1. Chalker, S. (1984). Current English Grammar. London: Macmillan Publishers Ltd
2. Collins Cobuild. (2000). English Grammar. Glasgow: Harper Collins Publishers
3. Eastwood, J. (1994). Oxford Guide to English Grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press
4. Evelyn P. Altenberg, Robert M. Vago. (2010), English Grammar: Understanding the Basics. New York: Cambridge University Press.
5. Greenbaum, S. (1991). An Introduction to English Grammar. Essex, England: Longman
6. Huddleston, R and Pullum, G.K. (2002). The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Esex, England: Longman
7. Leech, G. and Svartvik, J. (1975). A Communicative Grammar of English. Essex, England: Longman
8. Quirk, R. and Greenbaum, S. (1973). A University Grammar of English. London: Longman.
9. Sanford, S. V. (2011). English Grammar. BiblioLife


SLAE 1023 - STRUCTURES OF ENGLISH


The course is designed to introduce and familiarize students with the structure of English word, phrases, clauses and sentences. The course aims to provide exposure to different approaches and analyses of the structure of the English language at the various levels. The course also provides students with the opportunity to explore and investigate structural patterns of the language with a view of more practical ways of teaching the language in the classroom. Among the topics included are brief description of the English language and language learning, elements that make up language and grammar, analyses of the structure of language at different levels: word, phrase, clause, sentence, some rules of sentence formation based on transformational grammar, and basic functional description and analyses of sentences. At the end of the course, students should be able to discuss the different structures of English(at the different levels of analysis), analyse different structures, apply the analyses to other structures and present analyses of different structures.

References
1. Downing, A. and Locke, P. (1992). A University Course in English Grammar. London: Prentice Hall International.
2. Eastwood, J. (1994). Oxford Guide to English Grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
3. Fabb, N. (1997). Sentence Structure. London: Routledge.
4. Fromkin, V. and Rodman, R. (1988). An Introduction to Language. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc.
5. Huddleston, R.D. (1976). An Introduction to English Transformational Sysntax. London: Longman.
6. Jespersen O. (2010). Growth and Structure of the English Language. Nabu Press
7. Laurel J. Brinton, Donna Brinton. (2010). The Linguistic Structure of Modern English. John Benjamins Publishing Company
8. Radford, A. D. (1981). Transformational Syntax. London: Arnold.
9. Tailerman, M. (1998). Understanding Syntax. London: Arnold.
10. Thomas, A.J. and Martinet, A.V. (1986). A Practical English Grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press.


SLAE 1112 - INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

This course is offered to first year students majoring in TESL. Students who register for this course should already have some knowledge about the various elements and types of literary works. In this course, a variety of literary texts, written by various writers of different backgrounds, will be analyzed for their structure, style, approaches and also underlying values, moral and truths. Exposure to the different approaches to the study of literary criticisms and styles of writing by different writers will enhance students appreciation and views of well known literary works.

References
1. Barnet, Sylvan. (1985). A Short Guide to Writing about Literature (5th ed.). Toronto: Little, Brown And Company.
2. Booth A. & Mays K. J. (2010). The Norton Introduction to Literature. W. W. Norton & Company, Incorporated
3. Bronte, C. (1994). Jane Eyre. England: Penguin Popular Classics.
4. Bronte, E. (1994). Wuthering Heights. England: Penguin Popular Classics.
5. Meyer M. (2010). Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing. Bedford/St. Martin's
6. Tan, A. (1988). The Joy Luck Club. United States: GP Putnam and Sons.


SLAE 1122 - LITERARY APPRECIATION

This course will expose the students to a number of well-known literary texts of authors of different backgrounds. Discussions will be based on the different forms and styles of these authors. Exposure to several approaches of literary criticism will enhance and expand students appreciation and views of literary works.

References

1. Boardman, R. & J. McRae (1984) Reading Between the Lines. Cambridge: CUP
2. Gower, R. & M. Pearson (1986) Reading Literature. London: Longman
3. Johnson, C. D. (1994) Understanding to Kill a Mockingbird: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historic Documents. New York: Greenwood Press
4. Lee, H. (1989) To Kill a Mockingbird. Arrow (Publisher)
5. Rogers, P. (ed) (2001) The Oxford Illustrated History of English Literature. Oxford: OUP
6. Spurr, B. (2006) Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan


SLAE 2013 - LINGUISTICS I

This course provides a useful introduction to the field of linguistics as intended for beginning students with no previous knowledge or training in the subject. Specifically, the course is designed to introduce basic concepts in linguistics to students who are preparing for a career in the teaching of English as a second language. The course explores the universal nature of language and its aims, and general methods and principles of linguistic theory. We will survey the fundamental linguistic concepts in phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. After having exposed to the basic principles in these core linguistic sub-fields, students will, hopefully have a sharper ear for language, a deeper understanding of its nature, and a healthier interest in all its manifestations.

References
1. Fromkin, V, R. Rodman and N. Hymes. (2007). An Introduction To Language. 8th edition. Boston: Thompson Wadsworth.
2. Finegan, E. (2011). Language: Its Structure And Use. International edition. Cengage Heinl
3. Frommer, P.R. and E. Finegan. (2003). Looking At Languages: A Workbook In Elementary Linguistics. 3rd edition. Heinle.
4. Hudson, G. (2000). Essential Introductory Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell.
5. Justice, P.W. (2004). Relevant Linguistics. Stanford: CSLI.
6. Finch, G. (1998). How To Study Linguistics. London: Mcmillan.
7. Pinker, S. (1994). The Language Instinct: How The Mind Creates Language. New York: Harper Collins.


SLAE 2042 - LINGUISTICS II

The course is a continuation of topics discussed in Linguistics I. having been introduced to theoretical fundamentals of core linguistics areas, students will now explore the applied areas of language variations, language change/decay, language and the society, language and power, and language planning. At the end of the course, students will be able to write short analytical paper consisting of their own observation of a linguistic phenomenon and discuss its relations with the relevant linguistic reasoning/theory that lies behind it.

References
1. Fromlin, V., R. Rodman and N.Hyams. (2007). An Introduction To Language. 8th Edition. Boston: Thomas Heinle.
2. Finegan, E. (2011). Language: Its Structure And Use. International edition. Cengage Heinl
3. Hudson, G. (2000). Essential Introductory Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell.
4. Pinker, S. (1994). The Language Instinct; How The Mind Creates Language. New York: Harper Collins
5. Wardhaugh, R. (1998). An introduction to Sociolinguistics. 3rd Edition. Oxford: Blackwell.

 

SLAE 2032 - METHODOLOGY IN TESL I

This course encourages learners to examine how theories and beliefs of language teaching/ learning are put into practice. Learners will be introduced to major trends and developments in second/ foreign language teaching/ learning. Each trend will be discussed and analysed so that learners will be better informed about its nature, strengths and weaknesses. Having gained insights into the theoretical and practical aspects of second/ foreign language teaching and learning, learners should thus be able to make informed choices when entering the teaching profession.

References

1. Bateman B. & Lago B. (2011). Methods of Language Teaching. Routledge
2. Brown, H. Douglas. (1994). Teaching by Principles: An Interactive Approach to Language Pedagogy. Prentice Hall.
3. Chitravelu, N., Sithamparam, S. and Choon, T.S. (1995). ELT Methodology: Principles and Practice. Shah Alam: Penerbit Fajar Bakti Sdn Bhd.
4. Krashen, Stephen D. (1981). Principles And Practice In Second Language Acquisition. English Language Teaching series. London: Prentice-Hall International (UK) Ltd.
5. Larsen-Freeman, Dianne. (1986). Techniques and Principles in Language Teaching. New York: Oxford University Press.
6. Nunan, David. (1991). Language Teaching Methodology: A Textbook for Teachers. Prentice Hall.
7. Prator, Clifford H. & Celce-Murcia, Marianne. (1979). "An outline of language teaching approaches." In Celce-Murcia, Marianne & McIntosh, Lois (Ed.), Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language. Newbury House.
8. Richards, Jack & Rodgers, Theodore. (1986). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. New York: Cambridge University Press.


SLAE 2022 - LANGUAGE LEARNING THEORIES


The course introduces students to some major views and theories in the area of language learning with emphasis on second language acquisition. It will examine some key issues in second language acquisition with special focus on the role of input and interaction in promoting learning or acquisition. The course will also provide practice in carrying out a small-scale project to investigate the nature of interaction in the classroom and their possible effects on second language development

References
1. Brown, H.D. (2007). Principles of Language Learning and Teaching (4th Edition). Pearson Longman.
2. Ellis, R. (1985). Understanding Second Language Acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
3. Ellis, R. (1997). Second Language Acquisition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
4. Gass, S.M. and Selinker, L. (1994). Second Language Acquisition: An Introductory Course. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
5. Lightbown, P.M. and Spada, N. (1999). How Language are Learned. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
6. McLaughlin, B. (1987). Theories of Second Language Acquisition. London: Edward Arnorl.


SLAE 2052 - METHODOLOGY IN TESL II


This course introduces students to some major trends in methods, approaches, assumptions and issues on the nature of language and how languages can be acquired and taught. It examines the notion of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT) of which the emphasis is on the teaching of integrated skills: listening, reading, speaking and writing. The course also provides opportunities for students to plan and practice an effective second language lesson based on the various theories, principles and methods of ELT methodology. The ELT issues discussed in this course include student-centred versus teacher-centred, learner autonomy, authenticity, process versus product, fluency versus accuracy and form versus meaning.

References
1. Bateman B. & Lago B. (2011). Methods of Language Teaching. Routledge
2. Celce-Murcia, M. (2001). Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language (3RD Edition). USA: Heinle&Heinle Publishers.
3. Chitravelu, N. S. Sithampara and S.C, Teh. (1995). ELT Methodology - Principles and Practice. Kuala Lumpur: Penerbit Fajar Bakti.
4. Coleman J.A. and J. Klapper (eds.). (2005). Effective Learning and Teaching in Modern Languages. London: Routledge.
5. Johnson, K. (1982). Communicative Syllabus Design and Methodology. Oxford: Pergamon Press
6. Mc Donough, J. and C. Shaw. (2003). Materials and Methods in ELT (2nd Edition). UK: Blackwell.
7. Nunan, D (editor). (2003). Practical English Language Teaching. New York: McGraw Hill.
8. Richards, J.S. and T.S. Rodgers. (2001). Approaches and Methods in Language Teaching. Cambridge: CUP.



SLAE 2132 - ACADEMIC SKILLS FOR TEACHERS OF ESL


This course is designed to further enhance and consolidate students language learning skills. It adopts the project-based approach where students are expected to incorporate the four language skills and academic skills towards the completion of their project. Input/data for the project are derived from both primary and secondary sources. The output of the project will be presented on a seminar presentation both in oral and written forms.

References
1. Westbrook, J. and Clarke, S. (2009). The Complete Guide To Becoming An English Teacher. London: SAGE Publication Ltd.
2. Evans, C., Midgley, A., Rigby, P., Warham, L., and P. Woolnough. (2009). Teaching English. London: SAGE Publication Ltd.
3. Elizabeth, M. E. S. (2010). Methods Of Teaching English. New Delhi: Discovery Publishing House.
4. Doff, A. (1998). Teach English: A Training Course for Teacher. Cambridge University Press.
5. Dulay, H. and Krashen, S. (1982). Language Two. New York: Oxford University Press.
6. Nunan, D. (1992). Methods in Language Learning. USA: Cambridge University Press.


SLAE 2062 - CLASSROOM OBSERVATION

The course introduces students to some basics of the language teaching profession which includes approaches to teaching practice, classroom management and teaching strategies. In addition, it will also provide students with knowledge on approaches to classroom observation and research. This will equip them with the skills of investigating a language-learning classroom. Amongst the research methods and techniques that will be introduced are the use of case studies, questionnaires, observation schedules, diaries, interviews and think-aloud in classroom investigation. This will provide students with the knowledge and skills to work through, either individually or collaboratively, the various steps involved in planning, conducting, evaluating and reporting a research project.

References
1. Dunn, Rita. (1998). The Complete Guide to the Learning Styles In-service System. Allyn & Bacon.
2. Emmer, Edmund T. (1999). (5th. Edition) Classroom Management for secondary teachers. Allyn & Bacon.
3. Eyster, R H., and Martin, C. (2010). Successful Classroom Management: Real-World, Time-Tested Techniques for the Most Important Skill Set Every Teacher Needs. Illinois: Sourcebook, Inc.
4. Greenlaw, Jim. (2000). English Language Arts and Reading on the Internet: a Resource for K-12 Teachers. Prentice-Hall.
5. Gower, R. & Walters, S. (1985). Teaching Practice Handbook: A Reference Book For EFL Teachers In Training. Heinemann Educational Books.
6. Ming-Tak, H., Wai-Shing, L. (2008). Classroom Management: Creating a Positive Learning Environment. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.
7. Nunan, D. (1989). Understanding Language Classrooms; A Guide For Teacher-Initiated Action. Prentice Hall
8. Popham, W. James. (1998). (2nd. Edition) Classroom Assessment: What Teachers Need To Know. Allyn & Bacon.
9. Savage, T. V., and Savage, M. K. (2009). Successful Classroom Management And Discipline: Teaching Self-Control And Responsibility. California: SAGE Publications Inc.
10. Walker, B.J. (1999). Diagnostic Teaching of Reading: Techniques for Instruction and Assessment. Prentice-Hall.

SLAE 3112 - SOCIOLINGUISTICS

The course will examine theories, research, and topics discussed in various readings in sociolinguistics. It central focus is on language learning and teaching in relation to social and cultural contexts. Some topics which will be looked into include language and society, language and variations, and sociolinguistics in language teaching. For each topic there is an overview of central issues in sociolinguistics and a discussion of implications for the language classroom. As an introductory course in a teacher training programme, it addresses the curricular and pedagogical implications of current theories and research in sociolinguistics. This will equip the teacher-trainees with the necessary knowledge to effectively teach culturally diverse classrooms and optimize their students’ learning.

References
1. Abdullah Hassan (1994). Language Planning in Southeast Asia. Kuala Lumpur: DBP.
2. Awang Sariyan. (2000). Warna dan Suasana: Perancangan Bahasa Melayu di Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur: DBP.
3. Holmes, J. (2000). An Introduction to Sociolinguistic. New York: Longman.
4. Hornberger, N. H. (2010). Sociolinguistics And Language Education. UK: Multilingual Matters.
5. McKay, S. & N. Hornberger (eds.) (1996). Sociolinguistics and Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
6. Spolsky, B. (1998). Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
7. Wardhaugh, R. (2009). An Introduction To Sociolinguistics. United Kingdom: John Wiley and Sons.
8. Wolfson, N. (1989). Perspectives: Sociolinguistics and TESOL. Philadelphia: Newbury House.


SLAE 3022 - CURRICULUM STUDIES IN TESL


The course introduces participants to issues in curriculum studies with special focus on TESL and the national English language curriculum. At macro level analysis, several broader philosophical and theoretical considerations in language-in-education planning, curriculum planning and curriculum decision making will be discussed. The micro level analysis will include planning processes and classroom implementation. Participants will be required to make critical analysis of selected readings or issues through classroom discussion and writing assignments to show their understanding of key issues.

References
1. Burke, J. (2003). The English Teacher's Companion: Guide to Classroom, Curriculum and the Profession. Heinemann.
2. Henson, K.T. (2000). Curriculum Planning: Integrating Multiculturalism, Constructivism, and Education Reform. McGraw-Hill Higher Education.
3. Gutek, G. (1988). Philosophical and Ideological Perspectives on Education. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
4. Johnson, R. (Ed.) (1989). The Second Language Curriculum. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
5. Kamaruddin Hj. Husin. (1994). KBSM dan Strategi Pengajaran Bahasa. Kuala Lumpur: Season.
6. Kelly, A.V. (1989). The Curriculum: Theory and Practice. London: Paul Chapman.
7. Melles G. (2009). Negotiating Curriculum Work in ESL. Lambert Academic Publishing
8. Nation I. S. P. & Macalister J. (2009). Languge Curriculum Design. Taylor & Francis.
9. Richards, J.C. (2001). Curriculum Development In Language Teaching. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.


SLAE 3122 - LITERATURE IN ELT


The course is designed to expose students to various teaching approaches suitable for the teaching of English through literature. It will emphasize on preparing students to generate own materials for their literature lessons based on the approaches introduced. Initially, students will go through some hands-on activities after lectures on the approaches. These activities will be based on different types of literary texts such as short stories, novels and poems. After the activities are conducted, discussions will be held to get students’ responses on the activities conducted and to discuss issues and concerns related to the use of literature in the ESL classroom. At the end of the course, students should be able to develop materials and activities using literary texts for the teaching of the English language.

References
1. Carter, R. and Long, M. (1991). Teaching Literature. London: Longman.
2. Collie, J. & Slater, S. (2005). Literature in the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
3. Chitravelu, N. et. al. (2002). ELT Methodology: Principles and Practice. Selangor: Penerbit Fajar Bakti Sdn. Bhd.
4. Frey O. (2010). Teaching Literature: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. GRIN Verlag.
5. Lazar, G. (1999). Literature and Language Teaching: A Guide for Teachers and Trainers. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press
6. Sell, R.D. & Brumfit, C. (Ed.) (1995). Literature Throughout Foreign Language Education: The Implications of Pragmatics. Southhampton: Phoenix ELT
7. Subramaniam, G. & Vethamani, M.E. (2003). Teaching of Literature in ESL/EFL Contexts. Petaling Jaya: Sasbadi Sdn. Bhd.
8. Talif, R. (1995). Teaching Literature in ESL: The Malaysian Context. Kuala Lumpur: Penerbit Universiti Pertanian Malaysia
9. Thaler E. (2008). Teaching English Literature. UTB
10. Yancey, K.B. (2004). Teaching Literature as Reflective Practice. Urbana, IL:National Council of Teachers of English


SLAE3012 - COMPUTER ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING I


This course introduces students to Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) with specific focus on the early CALL and its relevance to a language learning classroom in Malaysia. Students will be introduced to the different definitions of CALL, the interdisciplinary perspective and theoretical background of CALL, the roles of the computer and teachers in a language classroom, and language learning software and its relevance in language teaching and learning. Part of the training involves giving students the opportunity to explore and evaluate different types of language learning and teaching software currently in the market. Also, students will be exposed to the different tools available on MSWord to enhance language teaching and learning. At the end of the course, students should be able to review and evaluate language learning software, prepare lesson plans and relevant teaching aids using tools available on MSWord so that classroom teaching and learning will be more effective.

References
1. Kenning, M. M. and Kenning, M.M. (1990). Computers In Language Classroom. Essex: Longman Group, UK Limited.
2. Levy, M. (1997). Computer Assisted Language Learning: Context and Conceptualization. New York: Oxford University Press.
3. Phil H. (2009). Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge
4. Saad Al Kahtani. (2009). Computer Assisted Language Learning. VDM Verlag
5. Sperling, D. (1997). The Internet Guide to English Language Teachers. New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc.
6. Uschi, F. (1998). Virtual Language Learning: Finding the gems among the pebbles. Melbourne, Australia.
7. Warschauer, M. (1995). (ed.) The Virtual Connections: On-line Activities and Projects for Networking Language Learners. Honolulu: Hawaii, Univ. of Hawaii Press.


SLAE 4032 - DISCOURSE ANALYSIS

This course will introduce students to the basic principles of analysing a unit beyond the sentence which is discourse. The course will first focus on the meaning of discourse analysis and survey theories of discourse. Students will then be given practice in examining both spoken and written forms of language as used in particular socio cultural contexts in which they function and analyse the meaning they construe. In addition, practical applications of discourse analysis in second language teaching and learning will be explored. Students will also be guided to investigate and analyse both spoken and written texts of their choice from any conversational context or written genre.

References
1. Celce-Murcia, M and Olshtain, E. (2000). Discourse And Context In Language Teaching. Cambridge.
2. Gee J. P. (2010). An Introduction to Discourse Analysis: Theory and Method. Taylor & Francis
3. Goffman, E. (1981). Forms of Talk. Oxford: Blackwell.
4. Hutchby, I & Wooffitt, R. (1998). Conversation Analysis. Principles, Practices And Applications. Cambridge: Polity Press/ Blackwells.
5. Jaworski, A. And Coupland, N. (eds) (1999). The Discourse Reader. London: Routledge.
6. Levinson, S. (1979). Activity Types And Language. Linguistics 17, 365-399.
7. McCarthy, M. (1991). Discourse Analysis for Language Teachers. Cambridge: CUP
8. Swales, J. (1990). Genre Analysis: English In Academic And Research Settings. Cambridge: CUP
9. Van Leeuwen, T. (2005). Introducing Social Semiotics. London: Routledge.
10. Yan X. (2010). Discourse Analysis. Lap Lambert Academic Publishing.



SLAE 4012 - ENGLISH FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES

The course introduces students to the theory and practice of teaching English in specific contexts. Students will be introduced to the nature of teaching English for Specific Purposes (ESP), with special focus on the practical aspects of conducting a target situation analysis, designing instructional materials and implementing the materials in an ESP class. Students are expected to draw from their knowledge especially of language learning theories, methodology, curriculum studies, materials adaptation and design and discourse analysis for this course. At the end of the course, students should be able to conduct a target needs analysis on a specific group of learners and prepare some sample instructional materials for the target group.

References
1. Basturkmen H. (2010). Developing Courses in English for Specific Purposes. Palgrave Macmillan.
2. Belcher D. D. (2009). English For Specific Purposes In Theory And Practice. University of Michigan Press.
3. Dudley-Evans, T. and St.John, M.J. (1998). Developments in English for Specific Purposes: A MultiDisciplinary Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
4. Hutchinson, T. and Waters, A. (1987). English for Specific Purposes: A learning-Centred Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
5. Khairi Izwan Abdullah, Louis, A.F., Abdul Halim Abdul Raof and Masputeriah Hamzah. (1995). Towards a Framework for Curriculum Design in ESP. ESP Malaysia, 3/1:13-26.
6. Martin, I. (1992). An Invitation To ESP. Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.
7. Richterich, R. and Chancerel, J-L. (1987). Identifying the Needs of Adults Learning a Foreign Language. Eagelwood Cliffs. N.J.: Prentice-Hall International.
8. Robinson, P.C. (1991). ESP Today: A Practitioner's Guide. New York: Prentice Hall.
9. Strevens, P. (1988). ESP After Twenty Years: A Re-Appraisal. In M.M. Tickoo (ed.), ESP: State of the Art. Anthology Series 21. Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre. Pp. 1-13.


SLAE 4022 - MATERIALS ADAPTATION AND DESIGN

The course incorporates four major areas of language learning materials development; i.e. materials selection, evaluation, adaptation, and design. The course will cover the roles of language learning materials and language teachers, the criteria of good teaching and learning materials, and the principles and theories relating to selecting, evaluating, adapting and designing materials.

References
1. Cunningworth, A. (1995). Choosing Your Coursebook. Oxford: Heinemann English Language Teaching.
2. Harmer, 1. (2001). The Practise of English Language Teaching. Essex: Pearson Education Limited.
3. Tomlinson, B. (2011). Materials Development in Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
4. Tomlinson, B. & Masuhara, H. (2004). Developing Language Course Materials. Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.
5. Ur, P. (2002). A Course In Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

SLAE 4112 - TEACHING MACRO SKILLS IN TESL

This course is designed to expose the students to the detail principles and practise of teaching reading, writing, speaking and listening skills introduced in Methodology in TESL II. It will emphasise on a wide range of techniques and activities in teaching the four skills and explores ways of integrating the skills in ESL. At the end of the course, students should be able to apply the techniques and activities in form-focused instruction.

References
1. Aslam M. (2006). Teaching of English. Foundation Book
2. Langer, J. & Filhan, S. (2004). Writing And Reading Relationships: Constructive Tasks. http://cela.albany.edu/publication/article/writeread.htm
3. Kennedy, B. L. (1994). The role of topic and the reading/writing connection. TESL-EJ Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language, 1 (1), 1-16. http://www-writing.berkeley.edu/TESL-EJ/ej01/a.3.html
4. Rose Tunku Ismail. (1999). A Guide To Listening For Specific Purposes. Utusan Publications & Distributors Sdn. Bhd.
5. Freeman, Diane-Larsen. (2000). Techniques And Principles In Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.


SLAE 4043 - LANGUAGE TESTING AND EVALUATION

The course is a comprehensive introduction to language testing and evaluation for language practitioners. It discusses theoretical issues and testing problems, particularly those related to the question of how, when and what to test. Topics covered include definitions of concepts of testing, functions and types of tests, item building and analysis, and construction of tests to meet the needs of language practitioners. To this end, there will be hands-on experience on test construction and test result analysis.

References
1. Alderson, J.C., Clapham, C. & Wall, D. (1999). Language Test Construction and Evaluation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
2. Bachman, L.F. (1990). Fundamental Considerations in Language Testing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
3. Bachman, L.F. & Palmer, A. S. (1996). Language Testing in Practice: Designing and Developing Useful Language Tests. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
4. Heaton, J.B. (1990). Classroom Testing. Harlow: Longman.
5. Henning, G. (1987). A Guide to Language Testing. Rowley: Newbury House Publishers.
6. Hornberger N. H & Shohamy E. (2008). Language Testing and Assessment. Springer
7. Hughes, A. (1989). Testing for Language Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
8. Weir, C.J. (1993). Understanding and Developing Language Tests. Prentice Hall International.
9. Röver, C. (2005). Testing ESL Pragmatics. Development and Validation of a Web-Based Assessment Battery. New York


SLAE 4122 - TEACHING ENGLISH FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY


This course is designed to expose the students to the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching English for Science and Technology (EST). It will emphasise on the nature of scientific and technical English in comparison with general English and the role of the English teacher in teaching EST. At the end of the course, students should be able to examine ways of applying general TESL methodologies in the teaching of EST and explore techniques in integrating the teaching of English into the students mainstream science and technical subjects.

References
1. Erben T., Ban R., Castenada M. E. (2008). Teaching English Language Learners Through Technology. Taylor & Francis
2. Hudson, T. (1991). A Content Comprehension Approach To Reading English For Science And Technology. TESOL Quarterly, 25, 1, pp. 77-100.
3. Dudley-Evans, T & St John, M.J. (1998). Developments In English For Specific Purposes: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
4. Hutchinson, T. & Waters, A. (1987). English For Specific Purposes: A Learner-Centred Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
6. Snow, M. A. & Brinton, D. M. (1997). The Content-Based Classroom: Perspectives On Integrating Language And Content. New York: Longman.
7. McNamara, T. (2000). Language Testing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
8. Rank T, Warren C & Milium T. (2011). Teaching English Using ICT: A Practical Guide for Secondary School Teachers. Continuum International Publishing Group


SLAE 4052 - COMPUTER ASSISTED LANGUAGE LEARNING II

This course introduces students to the roles that computers, specifically, the Internet, play in a language teaching and learning classroom. Students will be introduced to the tools available on the Internet that can be used in the classroom to enhance language teaching and learning. As such students will be required to use electronic communication, on-line resources and materials on the web. To maximize the effectiveness of using the Internet in the classroom, students will be exposed to the skills of reviewing and evaluating language learning websites, using communication tools in creating and maintaining specific interest group and developing relevant language teaching and learning materials for classroom use. Students are expected to draw from their knowledge of language learning theories, methodology, AuthorWare development, web page design, materials adaptation and design for this course. At the end of the course students should be able to review, evaluate and adapt the content of a language learning/ teaching web page relevant to the KBSM syllabus and design a simple language teaching/ learning web page to be incorporated in their language teaching classroom.

References
1. Kenning, M. M. and Kenning, M.M. (19900. Computers In Language Classroom. Essex: Longman Group, UK Limited.
2. Levy, M. (1997). Computer Assisted Language Learning: Context and Conceptualization. New York: Oxford University Press.
3. Phil H. (2009). Computer Assisted Language Learning. Routledge
4. Saad Al Kahtani. (2009). Computer Assisted Language Learning. VDM Verlag
5. Sperling, D. (1997). The Internet Guide to English Language Teachers. New Jersey: Prentice Hall Inc.
6. Uschi, F. (1998). Virtual Language Learning: Finding The Gems Among The Pebbles. Melbourne, Australia.
7. Warschauer, M. (1995). (ed.) The Virtual Connections: On-line Activities and Projects for Networking Language Learners. Honolulu: Hawaii, Univ. of Hawaii Press.

 

 

 



:: Overview | Programme Objectives | Learning Outcomes | Classifications |Programme Structures and Features ::
| Career Prospects dan Other Information | Subject Synopsis | Home ::


Copyright 2017 © Faculty Of Education, UTM Skudai